Professor Ian Goldin

Professor Ian Goldin

Oxford University Professor of Globalisation and Development

Ian was the Founding Director of the Oxford Martin School from September 2006 to September 2016. As Former Adviser to Nelson Mandela and Vice President at the World Bank, Ian is well qualified to talk about future global shocks and opportunities.

Speaker enquiry

Ian is currently the Director of the Oxford Martin School at Oxford University and was a former adviser to Nelson Mandela and Vice President at the World Bank.

As Vice President of the World Bank (2003-2006) and prior to that the Bank’s Director of Development Policy (2001-2003), he served on the Bank’s senior management team and led their collaboration with the United Nations and other partners. As Director of Development Policy, he played a pivotal role in the research and strategy agenda of the Bank.

From 1996 to 2001 he was Chief Executive and Managing Director of the Development Bank of Southern Africa and served as an advisor to President Nelson Mandela. He succeeded in transforming the Bank to become the leading agent of development in the 14 countries of Southern Africa. During this period, Ian served on several Government committees and Boards, and was Finance Director for South Africa’s Olympic Bid.

Previously, Ian was Principal Economist at the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD) in London, and Program Director at the OECD Development Centre in Paris, where he directed the Programs on Trade, Environment and Sustainable Development.

Ian has received wide recognition for his contributions to development and research, including having been knighted by the French Government and nominated Global Leader of Tomorrow by the World Economic Forum. He has published over 50 articles and 19 books.

View more

Decision Making
Digital
Futurism
Innovation/Creativity
Leadership

Age of Discovery: Navigating the Risks and Rewards of Our New Renaissance

We've been here before. The first Renaissance, the time of Columbus, Copernicus, Gutenberg and others, redrew all maps of the world, liberated information and shifted Western civilization from the medieval to the early modern era. Such change came at a price: social division, political extremism, economic shocks, pandemics and other unintended consequences of human endeavour. Now is our second Renaissance. In the face of terrorism, Brexit, refugee crises and the global impact of a Trump presidency, we can flourish-if we heed the urgent lessons of history...

More info

Divided Nations: Why global governance is failing, and what we can do about it

With rapid globalization, the world is more deeply interconnected than ever before. While this has its advantages, it also brings with it systemic risks that are only just being identified and understood. Rapid urbanization, together with technological leaps, such as the Internet, mean that we are now physically and virtually closer than ever in humanity's history.

More info

The Butterfly Defect: How Globalization Creates Systemic Risks, and What to Do about It

The Butterfly Defect addresses the widening gap between the new systemic risks generated by globalization and their effective management. It shows how the dynamics of turbo-charged globalization has the potential and power to destabilize our societies. Drawing on the latest insights from a wide variety of disciplines, Ian Goldin and Mike Mariathasan provide practical guidance for how governments, businesses, and individuals can better manage globalization and risk.

More info

Is the Planet Full?

In this book, leading academics with a wide range of expertise in demography, philosophy, biology, climate science, economics and environmental sustainability explore the contexts, costs and benefits of a burgeoning population on our economic, social and environmental systems.

More info

Exceptional People: How Migration Shaped Our World and Will Define Our Future

A guide to vigorous debate and action, "Exceptional People" charts the past and present of international migration and makes practical recommendations that will allow everyone to benefit from its unstoppable future growth.

More info

Tweets

The growing significance of biases in AI tools, based on necessarily backward looking data which is coded in a way that reinforces past prejudices and patterns, risks perpetuating stereotypes, discrimination and the status quo.

David Autor, the academic voice of the American worker - Face value https://t.co/1Ejn9d8QfN

A great pleasure to have a conversation with ⁦@sapinker⁩ last night in the packed ⁦@UniofOxford⁩ Sheldonian Theatre in which he explained what I think of as the Pinker Paradox: if there is so much progress why do people feel so gloomy?

Glad you enjoyed it. I did too!

I enjoyed the conversation!

Load More...

To book call us now at +44 (0)20 8948 1334 or email info@harveythorneycroft.co.uk